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7 Deadly Chess Mistakes Every Novice Player Makes E-mail
Written by Yury Markushin   
Wednesday, 07 October 2009 21:33

chess mistakes

Here is a list of 7 mistakes most commonly seen on amateur level. Many chess players just do not realize why they keep losing these games. The answer is simple. These players keep making the same mistakes over and over again, in every single game they play. How many games could have been won by avoiding these simple mistakes most people make? Take a look at the list and you will avoid these blunders!



  • Mistake #7 Neglecting the development and sudden queen strikes is what tend to be very often classified as an opening mistake. It is hardly ever seen on Master's level. But it seems like every player at the initial stage of his chess career does it. Why is it bad to give a quick queen check in a first few moves of the game? Well, first of all it usually allows an opponent to interpose with a pawn, knight or a bishop, gaining a golden tempo by making the queen to retreat. Secondly, since the queen is such a strong piece players usually are uncertain about where it should be placed, so they tend to delay any queen moves to a better time (called a middle game). Of course, there are plenty of exceptions for what I just said. For example, in positions where it is possible to win some material it is surely the best to make a queen move. Always remember that the opening is for developing chess pieces and not for hunting down opponent’s unprotected rook and knight pawns, while sacrificing the development whatsoever. Getting too greedy in the opening can cost you a game. Take a look at my another useful article on Opening Tips.
  • Mistake # 6 Neglecting pins is another very common characteristic of novice chess players. It is always a good practice to get rid of all pins or to “un-pin” your pieces even if you don’t see the immediate danger. How many times novices lose pinned pieces when just a few moves ago they simply ignored the pin? Millions of Knights, Bishops and even Rooks were lost that way.
  • Mistake #5 Creating weak pawns is probably the second most favorite hobby of novice players after the unnecessary queen moves. They either push pawns so deep into the enemy’s territory that there is no way to protect it (overextended pawns), or in opposite create weak “backwards” pawns and struggle in the endgame. Always think twice before the pawn move, pawns do not go back.
  • Mistake #4 Even more deadly chess habit is to ignore pawns completely. I saw many novice players myself who just completely ignore pawns. For some unknown reason they think that since a pawn is the least valuable soldier in chess army it is not important to save it. I saw many endgames when one party had 6 pawns and other had just 2. It is not very hard to figure out who won. The lesson is to save the pawns; otherwise you will lose your endgame right in the middle game (C).
  • Mistake #3 Unnecessary piece moves is also very common mistake novice chess players make.  Remember that all the moves in chess are to be made on purpose and for a reason. If you do not know what your move is for, don’t make it. It’s that simple, just look for another one.
  • Mistake #2 Ignoring king safety can be very dangerous strategy, just like in #7 many games were lost because of unprotected king was quickly checkmated. The thing that many chess players very often forget: checkmate wins the game, not the extra pawn you got right before your king was checkmated while you made 3 moves with a queen to get that pawn. Remember that and you’ll be the one who will checkmate first.
  • Mistake #1 Believe it or not, but not being focused loses a lot more games that all the previous mistakes combined. Novice player are just do not have enough chess experience and confidence in order to stay focused for the whole game. At some point, novices drop a pawn. Later on – a piece. Afterwards, they lose rather quickly. The lesson is a simple – keep an eye on all your pieces and pawns and you’ll be fine in your game. By simply not losing material you will be able to hold against a much stronger player. Check out my guide How to Beat a Stronger Player which explores this topic in greater depth.

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Last Updated on Monday, 27 October 2014 20:48
 

Comments  

 
0 #15 Yury 2016-10-20 22:45
Quoting bharat:
I went through the article till the end and it is very helpful for the one who wants to learn chess. my special thanks to TheChessWorld and to the auther. thank you

You are very welcome!
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+2 #14 bharat 2016-10-19 19:01
I went through the article till the end and it is very helpful for the one who wants to learn chess. my special thanks to TheChessWorld and to the auther. thank you
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0 #13 Nelson omondi 2014-01-28 04:26
chess[youtube]chess[ /youtube]
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+6 #12 Yury 2012-02-26 15:48
Quoting Scott Mathis:
One of the most common mistakes that some of my students make is making too many fast, impulsive moves. There is a story about Susan Polgar concerning impulsive moves. Apparently, she had a terrible problem making fast, impulsive moves. The problem was so bad that her father and coach, Laszlo Polgar made her sit on her hands between moves. She was not allowed to remove her hands until she had considered all the candidate moves and made a final decision.

I have had success employing this technique with my own students. They may look silly sitting on their hands, but it works.


Hello Scott, and thanks for sharing your technique for fighting "impulsive" moves. I think it can be a problem especially for younger players and keeping their hands busy while mind open to chess would certainly help!
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+7 #11 Scott Mathis 2012-02-18 15:01
One of the most common mistakes that some of my students make is making too many fast, impulsive moves. There is a story about Susan Polgar concerning impulsive moves. Apparently, she had a terrible problem making fast, impulsive moves. The problem was so bad that her father and coach, Laszlo Polgar made her sit on her hands between moves. She was not allowed to remove her hands until she had considered all the candidate moves and made a final decision.

I have had success employing this technique with my own students. They may look silly sitting on their hands, but it works.
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+4 #10 Yury 2011-07-25 23:30
Take it easy, it's just a game ;-)
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-2 #9 Pearl Gandotra 2011-07-24 19:44
I hate This thing!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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+3 #8 Yury 2011-07-07 21:24
Actually there is something interesting in your idea... the easier is the piece to sacrifice the greater it's value :) Queen 9 point = extremely easy to sac, pawn = 1 point => somewhat hard to sac.
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+3 #7 helltank 2011-07-06 04:29
A good article.

Damn nice, but I feel too many sites are neglecting the Queens use as... guess what? Suicide bomber! I've never read any chess tips that encourage this, but I find that if I'm going for the quick n' fierce attack, and the Queen gets in the way or becomes redundant due to my pieces blocking, I pretty much exchange with the other Queen.
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+1 #6 Yury 2011-03-19 00:36
Thanks, Daniel. I'm glad you find this information useful!
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